After a divorce, it’s quite common for parents to increase their efforts to provide a loving and stable environment for their children. This often leads to overparenting, which is characterized by overprotection and overindulgence of a child. Very Well Family explains some of the signs of overparenting so you can determine whether you or your ex are exhibiting these troublesome behaviors. 

Take a look at your relationship with the other adults in your child’s life. Are you constantly at odds with the decisions they make, to the point that you feel you’re the only one capable of properly parenting your child? If so, you could be that you’re trying to impose your strict standards on others. Barring instances of abuse or legitimate ill-treatment, teachers, daycare workers, and even relatives should be permitted to act normally towards your child. 

Also, consider how many chores and tasks your child is responsible for in the home. Chores are a way to prepare your child for being an adult. When you withhold responsibility, you make it more difficult for your child to cope later in life. Chores can be age-appropriate if you’re concerned about your child becoming hurt or being overwhelmed. In the same token, it’s OK to allow your child to fail from time to time, even if it’s distressing to you. Failure is a part of life and can help a person build character when he or she learns how to fail gracefully.

Your relationship with your child may also suffer as a result of overparenting. Power struggles are not healthy and are usually indicative of a problematic parenting style. Your child should be allowed to make decisions on his or her own within reason. As long as kids aren’t at risk of hurting themselves or others, parents should step back and allow them to make their own decisions regarding the way they dress, how they style their hair, or what extracurricular activities they prefer.