In Florida, non-custodial parents are often ordered to pay child support to ensure their offspring remain financially stable. When these payments fail to materialize it can be a frustrating experience, so much so that you may want to withhold visitation until back payments are made. VeryWellFamily.com explains what you can do about unpaid child support and why revoking visitation rights may not be in your, or your child’s, best interests.

Visitation & Support Are Not Connected

While one could look at a parent’s failure to provide for his or her child financially as a sign of neglect, courts emphasize the importance of both parents having a healthy relationship with their children. As a result, child support and visitation are looked at as two different subjects. A parent who doesn’t want a relationship with a child isn’t absolved from providing child support. Conversely, a parent who is unwilling or unable to make payments can’t be prevented from seeing a child.

Revoking Visitation Could Harm You

Additionally, if you withhold visitation the court might take a poor view of your parenting ability. Except in situations involving abuse, courts think it’s best for both parents to be involved with their children. When you prevent this from occurring your ex could use it against you in future cases. This can impact existing custody arrangements so that the non-custodial parent can enjoy quality time with a child without interference.

How to Address Unpaid Support

When it comes to missing support payments, your best bet is to contact the office of support enforcement in your area to report the issue. After an accumulation of missed payments your former spouse may be subject to wage garnishment, license suspension, or even jail time. Not only might you receive back payments using this method, yo won’t incur any negative effects as a result of your actions.