Divorce can be stressful for any Floridian, but for the average resident in particular, such a process can be mentally, physically and financially taxing. This is especially true for many who have children, as deciding child custody arrangements can take a considerable amount of time and dedication. Some parents refuse to accept court orders for visitation. Others abuse their privileges by keeping a child longer than permitted. Child custody tensions can open the door for extremely difficult times, but above all else, they can make matters worse for the children themselves. 

According to an article in Psychology Today, there are some tactics to child custody that work better than others. For example, it is common for parents to talk negatively about their ex-spouse in front of children, or even courts, in an effort to gain full custody. Psychology Today warns against such actions, however, for they could linger and make the process more difficult for anyone involved. Doing so can slow down court procedures and can make children uncomfortable in a time that is often already filled with stress. Another common issue is that of personal, political or religious views; a liberal parent who attempts to override a conservative ex-spouse’s rules may end up with trouble when those rules are perpetually conflicting. 

Florida’s Sixth Judicial Circuit also outlines some common do’s and don’ts for newly divorced parents struggling with child custody. When it comes to visitation, the Circuit reminds parents that children are the focal concern — stirring conflicts to rob an ex-spouse from visitation time can be incredibly harmful to children. To best navigate this trying phase of life, Florida regulations advise parents to encourage visitation so that children can feel more at ease. Keeping an open and flexible schedule, developing routines, outlining rules and disciplinary measures and spending one-on-one time with children are just some of the many ways parents can make a negative situation a more positive one over time.